Lost and Found (A Novel)


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He wanted to swear loudly. He wanted to hit something. Really, very, hard. The young and the old are regarded with sympathy in the novel — its villains are the few middle-class adults. Every figure of authority, for example a store manager, a policeman is dismissed as narcissistic or ignorant. Even Millie strikes up a youthful, if physically innocent romance with a young boy on a train. At best, it has a charming immaturity and stylistic freshness; at worst, a quick rejection of middle-class adulthood. That kind of storytelling seems harder to find these days.

Copyright owned or licensed by Toronto Star Newspapers Limited. Things will never be the same again after this trip across Australia. Breaking some rules and laws along the way. Millie misses her mum, why did she go away? Why did she not come back for Millie after telling her to wait for her in the department store, under the rack where the big ladies knickers were? Why indeed. Millie meets other mums along the journey, this little bit of Millie's heart nearly broke me. And Millie wants to curl up in her arms and stay there and never leave, but she doesn't do that because the lady isn't her mum and you can't really do that to mums who aren't yours.

But you should be able to hug all the mums who aren't yours, because some people don't have mums and what are they supposed to do with all the hugs they have? The book is unique and special, very character driven, written with so much heart and soul. The author wrote the book based on very personal loss and circumstances. I think that comes across in it, it's so raw emotionally in places, I had a lump in my throat a few times.

I adored these three misfit characters , I loved watching the relationship dynamics change between them on their quest to find Millie's mum. It's so special and so heart warming. Insights into everyday people, loneliness, loss and more.

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It's a wonderful thing to be part of. So, in saying and sharing all of this. What an astonishing book, just read it, make a nice cup of tea or coffee, turn off the TV and your phone, open it up or start up your Kindle and jump into the world that is Millie Bird and her very special journey. I received a copy of this book thanks to the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Feb 28, Sally rated it it was ok Shelves: australian-author , contemporary-fiction. I really wanted to like this book, many of my reading friends, whose opinions I trust, loved it; the critics were certainly praising it to the hilt - but I just didn't.

I also had trouble with the speech — when a character spoke it was all in italics; and not necessarily a new line for I really wanted to like this book, many of my reading friends, whose opinions I trust, loved it; the critics were certainly praising it to the hilt - but I just didn't. I also had trouble with the speech — when a character spoke it was all in italics; and not necessarily a new line for each person instead it often just started in the paragraph whenever a thought became the spoken word.

It irked me no end. Maybe I was put off at the very start when she found her dead dog I was appalled at the indifference of her parents not giving it a decent burial, or removing the body, instead they just dumped it in the garden. I was told this was black humour - sorry didn't get the humour. View all 13 comments.

Jul 03, Michael rated it really liked it Shelves: ozzie-gems , favourites. Brooke Davis first came to the attention of the Australian reading public in with her short story 'Karl the Touch Typist'. It won the QUT Creative Writing Prize that year and since then the Western Australian author has added some more quirky characters, along with Karl in what is her debut novel. We knew from Davis's short story that Karl had broken out of a nursing home and now we get to found out why. He is on a mission to live his life to the fullest and try his best to be a real man whi Brooke Davis first came to the attention of the Australian reading public in with her short story 'Karl the Touch Typist'.

He is on a mission to live his life to the fullest and try his best to be a real man while helping seven year old Millie Bird find her mum who has abandoned her and befriend the cranky and strange widow Agatha Pantha who yells but quietly wonders 'How do you get old without letting sadness become everything? Lost and found is a beautiful and whimsical story that explores how we as people discard or lose things, either through carelessness, circumstance or neglect and finding kindness where we least expect it.

Davis does a wonderful job of saying a lot in as few words as possible and at just pages delivers so much pleasure in what is a small investment of time. You can tell she looks at the world uniquely and it comes through in what is a delightful read. View 2 comments. Aug 30, Anne Mcginnes rated it it was ok. Little Millie learns to deal with grief, death and abandonment in company with two elderly people also dealing with grief. I really wanted to like this book but I didn't.

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I just didn't believe the premise it was based on and I didn't believe the characters. The whole thing was too cutesey and artificial for me. I was particularly annoyed by the characterisation of the old people, Agatha and Karl. There was no subtlety. I think the author meant their personalities, their behaviour and their strange Little Millie learns to deal with grief, death and abandonment in company with two elderly people also dealing with grief.

I think the author meant their personalities, their behaviour and their strange habits to come across as quirky, endearing and eccentric, but they just seemed cartoonish to me and I didn't like the way Davis poked fun at the vulnerability of the elderly. However, I must acknowledge that my opinion seems to be out of step with most reviewers who describe the book as "whimsical" and "heart-warming". I must have missed something.

View all 4 comments. Shelves: kindle-edition , favorite-books , aussie-author , debut-novel , favorite-authors , own-book , junerelease , recommended-by-michael1 , own-kindle-book , group-read. I'm going to go the full five stars with this one as I absolutely loved it!! From start to finish it had me hooked and I loved the quirky characters with all their nutty activities and routine peccadilloes.

I found them totally believable and Brooke Davis 's ability to tap into the unique psyche of each of the characters was just brilliant Nothing was left out, every detailed tho Lost and Found by Brooke Davis Read from July 15 to 16, This is an incredible debut novel! Nothing was left out, every detailed thought down to the smallest of actions was well orchestrated and performed.

I wanted this book to go on and on and wondered what kind of an ending could possibly be satisfactory as the, "all lived happily ever after" scenario didn't seem likely or plausible. I figured it could go a couple of ways but in the end I was surprised The book gives some wonderful perspectives on life and death, and growing up, and growing old It is, in a special way, profound. Many times throughout I laughed out loud and teared up in equal measure, it certainly tugged at the heart strings.

I was sad to turn the last page, because it meant it was over. For me, this is a keeper! In reading this I was reminded of books like The Storied Life of A. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin and Harold and Maude by Colin Higgins , two favorites of mine, both for their quirky characters and storylines. View all 5 comments. Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. It was a little bit strange, and a little bit funny in places, and the characters were quite strange too. In hell, you have t Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis.

In hell, you have to uh… do the Macarena. How anyone could abandon their 7-year-old daughter in a department store was just beyond me. The constant shouting was a bit weird too, and the talk about penises was a little shocking as well. Write that down! And the way they came to know each other, and the adventures they had along the way. Mar 09, Lisa rated it it was amazing Shelves: australia. Phenomenal book here! Don't miss this one, especially if you do audio, the narrations are among the very best I've ever experienced.

I laughed out loud about 3 dozen times and that's no exaggeration. This book is witty, wise, and touching. Such memorable characters! May 17, Ashley Adriana maria rated it it was ok. DNF at page I really tried but its is just to unbelievable. The characters, their lives, the things they do and say.

Its just all too weird. Jul 06, Kate rated it liked it. A few weeks ago, I watched Australian Story. For my overseas readers, Australian Story is a weekly half-hour doco, featuring a story about an Australian — sometimes unsung heroes, sometimes ordinary people dealing with extraordinary issues. My husband loves this show. And he usually answers.

Bugs and oranges and Christmas trees and houses and letterboxes and train rides and textas and candles and old people and young people and people in between. Mums bring you jackets and turn on your electric blanket before you get into bed and always know what you want better than you do. Deeper themes are explored through each character — death, love, companionship — these themes are equally relevant for each character but executed using different sets of circumstances and back-stories.

But things went awry when I was introduced to the character Agatha, whose full name is Agatha Pantha. And the shenanigans of this trio of characters sometimes bordered on comical — slap-stick high jinx. And I kept coming back to the fact that there is an abandoned seven-year-old at the heart of it all… And… And… My daughter is seven and the thought of her being left on her own in a shopping centre, even for a nanosecond, makes my stomach clench and my throat close in fear.

Karl evens out the extremes. I received my copy of Lost and Found from the publisher, Hachette Australia, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Dec 22, Amanda rated it it was amazing Shelves: my-absolute-favourites. What a fantastic, quirky little novel! Masking a very sad and heartbreaking story are a lot of hilarious, laugh out loud moments. I really enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more from this author.

This is a gorgeous, little gem of a book. Although it deals with serious matters like grief, loss, abandonment and death it has many humorous moments and is guaranteed to make you smile while tugging at your heartstrings at the same time. Millie Bird is a delightful red headed, 7 y old girl. As with all young children, she struggles to understand death and has a Book of Dead Things starting with her dog Rambo, a spider, a bird, Grandma, next door's cat and then at number 28 her Dad.

Millie's Mum This is a gorgeous, little gem of a book. Millie's Mum does not cope well with the death of her husband and one day abandons Millie in a shopping centre next to a rack of Ginormous Undies. While waiting in the department store, Millie has many adventures and befriends Karl the Touch Typist, who is constantly typing messages to his dead wife with his fingers and has escaped from an old peoples home.

Eventually Millie seeks help from a neighbour, Agatha Pantha, a cranky old woman who has not left her house in the seven years since the death of her husband and spends her days peering through her window shouting abuse at people passing by. Agatha and Karl both set out to help Millie find her Mum. They have both suffered from loneliness and isolation since the loss of their partners and Millie helps to open the world up to them again and helps them see it's important to overcome grief and live while we can.

I loved the way Brooke Davis is able to see into the minds of children, particularly Millie but also her friend Jeremy aka Captain Everything. Millie's antics in the shopping centre were delightful and her yearning for her Mum real and heartfelt, with her leaving a string of notes 'In here Mum' as she went in case her Mum was trying to find her. It is also clear that the author has great empathy with elderly people, seeing beyond their wrinkles and infirmities to the core of their personalities and showing that they need not be invisible.

It's the idiosyncratic touches that the author uses to tell her story that make this book so charming. Such as Agatha's reaction to the casseroles left by her neighbours following her husband's death and her naming of chairs according to their uses ie. Although the book ends somewhat abruptly, I was happy with the ending and felt it was a satisfying outcome, although would have been curious to know a little more about how it came about.

In particular view spoiler [ I would have liked to know more about Millie's Mum. Why was she fleeing, where was she going and did she ever make contact with Millie again? Highly recommended. Jun 30, Phrynne rated it liked it. This was a quirky and entertaining read about a delightful little girl, abandoned by her mother but protected by fortune in quite remarkable ways. I loved Millie and my heart ached for her every time she put up one of her notices saying "In here mum. And the ending took me quite by surprise in that it just kind of happened with no warning and no real conclusion to events.

This This was a quirky and entertaining read about a delightful little girl, abandoned by her mother but protected by fortune in quite remarkable ways. However I will remember the beginning of the book for a long time - those scenes in the department store are priceless! I would recommend this book to anyone who likes their characters a bit odd and their stories not held back by facts. Rarely does a book arrive on my doormat so over-egged with praise.

Rarely does a book so desperately fail to live up to its supposed promise. According to the cover blurb, 'The search is over for the star debut of '. According to the publishers, this is 'a mix of great storytelling and truly memorable characters, sparkling humour and deep emotion'. It cannot hold a crate of candles to any of them. I'm afraid I disliked it from the very start. Well, gosh. Who thinks a child finding her dog dead at the side of the road, funny? It is the appalling callous indifference of her parents about the dead dog - to the extent that they cannot even be bothered to dig a grave for Rambo but dump him in the garden - that has these people rolling in the aisles?

I'm afraid I failed to see the joke, and it didn't get any better as it went on, either. Lost and Found doesn't sparkle. The plot is silly. It isn't funny. It isn't touching. Far from being memorable, the characters are shallow and two-dimensional to the point where I wondered if they were really meant to be like this; if it was some point the author was making, but considering the development of the plot and the sheer childishness of the whole project, I truly doubt it. I really didn't get this book at all. But apparently, this was 3 in the Australian bestsellers lists, so maybe it's a cultural thing?

Because I found it empty, irritating, and deeply disappointing. View all 6 comments. Mar 23, Shelleyrae at Book'd Out rated it really liked it Shelves: arc-are , netgalley-reviews , aussie-author , aww Three months after her dad became A Dead Thing, Millie Bird's mother takes her to a department store and asks her to wait for her. Clutching her backpack stuffed with frozen juice boxes, texta's, tea light candles, a Just In Case glass jar and her Book of Dead Things, Millie waits, huddled under a rack of Ginormous Women's Underwear, for her mother's gold shoes to come click clacking back.

Karl the Touch Typist, an 87 year old escapee from a nursing home still mourning the loss of his beloved wi Three months after her dad became A Dead Thing, Millie Bird's mother takes her to a department store and asks her to wait for her. Karl the Touch Typist, an 87 year old escapee from a nursing home still mourning the loss of his beloved wife, Evie, is looking for one last grand adventure and he finds it when a little girl, who has been abandoned by her mother, takes his hand.

Agatha Pantha has not left her home in seven years. She spends her days staring at her aging self in the mirror, listening to the static of the TV, and shouting insults at the people and things she can see from her living room window. Until the day a little girl with the red gumboots to match her curly red hair, knocks on her door. These three unusual characters, lost souls who have somehow found each other, embark on a wild cross country quest to reunite Millie with her mother. A quirky tale of loss, grief and love, Lost and Found is a touching debut from Brooke Davis.

It confronts the taboo's of death and aging with sharp observations and an unique sense of humour incorporating a madcap road trip, a one legged mannequin and stolen keyboard letters. The characters eccentricities are delightful. Seven year old Millie is endearing in all her precocious innocence, struggling to understand where people go when they leave.

Karl, whose fingers never tire of typing love letters to his deceased wife, searching for his lost youth and vitality, and Agatha, whose shouty abrasiveness prevents her from feeling lonely and unloved. Jun 03, Michael Robotham rated it really liked it. I was dazzled by some of the language and observations in this book.

A little twee or overly cute in places, but we should forgive this in a debut novel. Brooke Davis has a stunning career ahead of her. Jun 21, Figgy rated it really liked it Shelves: arc-or-netgalley , format-ebook , owned , reviewed , owned-physical-copy. Meet Millie. She was fascinated by Dead Things even before her father became one. He was her twenty-ninth Dead Thing. Actual rating 3. ETA - Decided on four stars because Millie broke my heart, and made me laugh, and just want more of her. That is just how she rolls. The fact is that she loves to help others but goes to an extreme as all the projects she takes on for them fills up her house.

One of the best feelings in the world came when she received a smile of appreciation, or a few grateful words. The crux of the story is a search for self — Martha is essentially lost and ultimately finds herself. At the same time, she also comes to care about herself first and foremost. It is a story about Family — the ties that bind us as well as the ties that choke us. There was an unusual stirring inside her stomach, of wanting to do something for herself, for once.

A touch of rebellion. Martha comes from a dysfunctional family in which there were secrets that are finally revealed to her. Martha used to write stories as a child and loved to share them with her grandmother Zelda. These stories are interspersed throughout the book and i found them to be an added bonus to an already entertaining read. But now, as Martha stared up at the sky, the moon was just the moon. The stars were only stars. Just a few pages in, Martha discovers a book which features her stories as well as other family tales.

The book is written by her grandmother and a note is written inside to Martha but the date is a few years after Zelda passed away. Martha sets out to solve this mystery — where did the book come from, when was it published and why is Zelda writing after her death. It is easy to dislike Martha in the beginning because she lets others walk all over her but her transformation is fascinating to witness.

You will want to root for Martha and cheer her on during her journey of self-discovery. Her transformation, albeit slow but steady, will leave you smiling and wanting more. Thank you to NetGalley and Harlequin Trade Publishing for an advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Every once in a while I need a palate cleanser between books. I want a charming story where things aren't going well for the main character in the beginning but through a series of entertaining events everything works out nice and neat in the end.

Phaedra Patrick tugged at my heart strings with her novel The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper so when I received an e-ARC of her upcoming release The Library of Lost and Found , I was looking forward to spending a chilly afternoon curled up with a cozy r Every once in a while I need a palate cleanser between books. Librarian Martha Storm has a problem with saying no.

She cared for her parents for many years before they passed away and now she continues to put others before herself and receives no appreciation whatsoever for it, especially from her sister Lillian. In fact, it seems everyone takes advantage of Martha's kindess. Her life changes when she finds a book of fairytales addressed to her on the library doorstep.

Inside is a dedication written to her from her grandmother With few clues, Martha begins a search for her grandmother who may still be alive. She meets some kind people on her journey and unwittingly uncovers family secrets that change her perspective and ultimately her relationship with her sister. The Library of Lost and Found is a heartwarming story about family and letting go of the past to make the most of the time we have.

If you're looking for a charming cozy read, give this book a try! The Library of Lost and Found is scheduled for release on March 26, For more reviews, visit www. In the past I have enjoyed reading books with a library setting, so thought I would try this one. It is fun to read books that mention other books and authors that I am familiar with. Martha Storm worked at the town library and was a helpful and giving woman with very low self esteem.


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When she finds a fairytale book in very rough shape with a dedication to her, Martha is puzzled. While searching for answers to her questions about the book, Martha uncovers family secrets and also discovers things In the past I have enjoyed reading books with a library setting, so thought I would try this one. While searching for answers to her questions about the book, Martha uncovers family secrets and also discovers things about herself.

The characters in this story are interesting, and quirky. The plot was engaging and caused me to experience a range of emotions from curiosity, suspicion, dread, humour, sadness, joy and wonder. Feb 02, Gail C. The Library of the Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick follows the story of Martha, a woman who is now approaching middle age and whose entire existence has devolved into doing anything and everything for others.

She measures her worth by the number of tasks she can take on, even as they begin to weigh her down and overwhelm her life. Into this chaos, a book surfaces that contains stories, some she made up and told her grandmother and others her grandmother made up with her. The curious thing? The The Library of the Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick follows the story of Martha, a woman who is now approaching middle age and whose entire existence has devolved into doing anything and everything for others.

There is also a bit of a mystery in the book. She advises Martha that the knowledge will be destructive, and that Zelda will turn out to be less than the person Martha idolizes in her mind. Parts of the book might be cathartic for people who grew up in dysfunctional households. His emotional abuse has had a profound effect on how Martha feels about herself and how she lives her life. If someone has experienced this type of abuse in their own life, they may find it comforting to see, at least in the world of fiction, that they are not alone. The pacing of the book is a bit erratic, with flashback chapters that highlight the activities of Martha or others of her family back when Martha was a child.

The shifts are sudden and, although the story makes sense in terms of the point trying to be made, they serve to slow the reading of the book and make movement through the novel somewhat jerky. There is a strong underlying agenda to this book that seems to have t deal with overcoming an abusive upbringing. This may give encouragement to people who are trying to heal their own wounds from growing up in more or less dysfunctional households.

Unfortunately, the uneven pacing of the book limits the positivity that might be derived for some readers. Thanks to NetGalley and Harlequin Trade Publishing for providing an advanced digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Apr 09, Amy rated it really liked it Shelves: physical-arcs. The only book I can even compare it to is Eleanor Oliphant and I liked this one better, it had the same sort of unique protagonist that just steals your heart by the end. Martha lives a simple life, she loves working at the library and she loves helping others.

Besides Martha there are so many kooky secondary characters throughout the book that I loved almost as much as I loved her.

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The Lost & Found

There was a feeling of magic in this one, the authors style was charming and so was this entire book! Feb 24, Dani - Perspective of a Writer rated it liked it Shelves: g-c-british , fiction-adult , g-t-historical , genre-mental-health , review-wrote-add-later , stars-3 , genre-romance-deliberately , stand-alone , imo-so-depressing-im-suicidal , reviewed.

Check out more reviews Perspective of a Writer Martha Storm has wasted her life doing everything It started when her parents became infirm and has lasted even after they passed on. When a book of fairy tales comes into her possession is when things start to change for this voluntary librarian.

The short review I am always on the lookout for a great book to share with my all female book club They tend to like books like this one If you read women's lit a lot then you'll at the very least enjoy this for what it is. For me it was really depressing. I won't reveal why, but I really dislike it when characters rationalize their poor mistakes. Your parents deceived you!! They USED you!! Their lives mattered more than you and all it would have taken them was a visit and the truth!!

I get it Why waste your elderly years on anger. Move on. See your past as idealistic so that you don't dwell on what you don't have. It's not an uplifting book to me. I'm satisfied that at least Martha found a sort of happiness now. The Library of Lost and Found helped her to let go of being the perfect daughter. It's not for me, but if you have a lot of regrets in your life Martha's journey will be one you can relate to and learn from.

The library actually had zero to do with Martha's lost and found journey. I expected a lot more interaction within the library and yeah, it wasn't even a big part of the setting. A bookshop got more time. The cover serves its purpose I suppose. It draws the eye of readers who love reading about bookworms, librarians and readers. You know right away what kind of book it will be due to the style I totally understand why it was chosen. Why does The Library of Lost and Found make for a great women's book club read?

There is this lovely dual narrative between the past and what happened to fracture this family and the present where Martha is learning the truth. And the secrets!! The regrets!! It has all the drama you want with a family's dirty laundry. Sisters are not perfect. It's a working relationship that we can easily get into a rut with and not question.

Much angst is explored with Martha's younger sister who knew more than she ever let on. Do you forgive and forget? There is what I thought of as a very obvious relationship and yet it stirs up potential for some really great discussion about same sex relationships and how they were viewed in the past to how they are today.

We are also in Britain! I love getting more of the British lifestyle and this is on the sea too. As a woman it is VERY easy to relate to doing to much for others. We all do it in some capacity. Where is the line? When is it TOO much?

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How much should you sacrifice? Through Martha a great discussion about self-care could be explored and really help readers think about their own lives. A HUGE message that even rang true with me is that the past is past. We have to make our decisions for now. It's too late for anything else. Anger, regret, shame This is a great theme in the book that any reader will appreciate. As a Writer Taste wise I really love books with an uplifting message.

And I hate rationalization in book characters, especially when its the protagonist. This has the dual one-two punch of not being uplifting to me and also having a character who rationalizes their choices instead of giving me the raw inside look of what it means to regret and choose now instead. The fact is Martha should have been kicking herself for her choices.

No matter how you look at it she missed out on some of the best times in her life. Her sister didn't. Zelda didn't. Martha DID! Give it to me down and dirty. If I'm going to be depressed by your terribly poor choices then I want it to matter! Then choose now. Choose today! That's where decisions matter. It has a ton to plumb while being an easy read!!

It has not influenced my opinions. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter Please like this review if you enjoyed it! Apr 09, Moonkiszt rated it it was ok Shelves: called-it-plot-end-halfway-in , meh , wish-for-rest-of-the-story , we-are-family , too-much-work-for-whatcha-get. It was just so. Kinda confusing. Resolves were clunky, characters stilted. I wanted to keep the main character propped up. When Martha thought to herself and there was LOTS of instances of her thinking to herself she kept thinking all she did was take care of others.

Well, to my thinking all she really did was think about herself - very egocentric. There were lots of honorable mentions by other characters about Martha's care for others. Overall I was mildly irritated wit It was just so. Overall I was mildly irritated with a primary character as soppy, spineless and all about the ways she'd been done wrong by every single thing in the world. I did like all the book mentions, the library environment as a healing place, but these were not enough to get me out of my cranky pants as it related to Martha. After Zelda comes on board I thought it might change.

Not a bit. In fact it gets a little odder with the family crisis in the past. Anyway, I'm feeling rather deflated. Ah well. I loved Arthur Pepper author's previous book's character. I do like Owen, tho, and wish less time was spent earlier in the book on self-pity, and that some development of the implied after party with Owen had been considered. Maybe I do need a romance bow on a story to be content. Hell's bell. There's a revelation I didn't want.

View all 3 comments. Quirky and warm, this bookish book about family secrets and starting over made me happy. Apr 22, Juli rated it really liked it Shelves: read-review-copies Martha Storm cared for her aging parents for 15 years before their deaths. She does favors for everyone.

She wants to be The Good Neighbor Her whole house is filled with these favors Then one book Martha recognizes the stories in the book What she finds out changes not only her view of the past, but her future. Beautiful story! The Library of Lost and Found is a complex and quirky but heartwarming story about a woman searching for her true place in the world. I loved how the stories Martha wrote as a child were woven in with the book's plot, revealing a deeper meaning.

The stories meant so much to Martha as a child This is the first book by Phaedra Patrick that I've read. I'm definitely going to read more by this author. All opinions expressed are entirely my own. Dec 21, Betty rated it it was amazing Shelves: cozy-mystery , e-books , arc.

Lost And Found by Oliver Jeffers book review

A new author for me, this is not my usual reading. I was not disappointed and will read this author again. Martha Storm who puts everyone's interest before her own. She keeps a document that lists all she has promised to do, that her house is so of unfinished items it is hard to move around in her home. She is unable to say no to anyone so people take advantage of her.

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